In.media logo

Posts Tagged ‘acquisitions’

04/23/12
Amanda Maffey

News of the Day


Alloy Digital Acquires Leading Digital Women’s Lifestyle Media Network and Publisher B5Media

NEW YORK, April 20, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Alloy Digital, a leading creator and distributor of media and entertainment for the 12-34 demographic, today announced that it has completed the acquisition of B5Media, one of the fastest-growing female-oriented lifestyle digital publishing and media networks.
B5Media’s websites include award-winning TheGloss.com, Crushable.com, Blisstree.com, Mommyish.com, and TheGrindstone.com, featuring content focused on fashion, beauty, wellness, career, relationships, parenting and entertainment.  The B5Media network, which has distinguished itself through honest, intelligent and relatable content, reaches females 14-34 and boasts a combined audience of more than 4 million monthly unique visitors.
The B5Media sites join Alloy Digital’s top ranking network of owned-and-operated web properties, including Gurl.com, Teen.com, and Smosh.com, which is also one of the top-three most subscribed to channels on YouTube.

Alloy Digital is the largest media and advertising network of young adult targeted websites, attracting more than 70 million consumers each month and reaching over 43% of P12-34 internet users. The network holds its position as a top-10 video network delivering several hundred million streams monthly and has ranked at top of its category for more than three consecutive years running according to industry measurement leader, comScore.
Read more: GlobeNewswire
Does Everyone Hate Banner Ads?
Whether you’re in advertising or not, at some point, everyone has been a banner ad hater. From a loud auto-initiated video at the office to an inundating takeover by Taylor Lautner – one that mysteriously became the background of my iPad and then wished me a “Happy St. Patrick’s Day” – we’ve all been victims of an unwanted, unwarranted, or irrelevant banner ad. Even when I tell people what I do, and mention online banner ads, their faces typically show a mild tolerance for the topic. Or they say flat-out, “I hate pop-ups.”
EMarketer estimates spending on U.S. online advertising will grow by nearly a quarter in 2012. However, banners’ projections are below average for the category. And they’ll continue to grow at a slower pace than other forms of online advertising such as paid search, video, and mobile. While banner click-through rates continue to decline, marketers are working to find more ways to validate that banner messaging resonates with consumers, from engagement to direct response metrics.Guess what? The secret is out: blasting billions of untargeted impressions to the masses and tracking latent activity is not an effective form of advertising – at least to some of us it is.

According to comScore Ad Metrix, AT&T, which has been the leader in advertising impressions for the last several years, served nearly 106 billion impressions in the U.S. during 2011. What’s more, the number of advertisers who served over 3 billion impressions in Q4 2011 increased from 24 to 46, compared to the same quarter the previous year. But let’s put this in context. EMarketer reported 231.9 million online users (18+) in the U.S. last year. So, if every adult watched an AT&T ad an even number of times, then it would have been seen an average of 456 times during the year. Yikes! Apparently we have a ways to go in shifting the paradigm.

Read more: ClickZ

04/13/12
Amanda Maffey

News of the Day


MediaMind 24/7 Partnership Could Lead to TV Integration

DG announced today a strategic partnership for deeper collaboration in advertising technology between MediaMind, its online unit, and 24/7 Media, WPP’s marketing technology company.
The partnership could form the basis of a global – in scope and in media – advertising delivery system that unites television advertising with digital. Here’s the score card: MediaMind was recently acquired by DG, a company that acts as the delivery system for between 80 to 90 percent of television ads, as well as syndicated content.

The DG platform takes content and creative from agencies or post-production houses and delivers it over IP network or satellite to the network operations centers of broadcasters. 24/7 Media, acquired by WPP in 2007, provides its Zeus Advertising Platform, or ZAP, to WPP clients. ZAP is an audience-management platform that lets brand advertisers track the effectiveness of individual marketing elements and how they influence conversion.

The acquisition of MediaMind by DG is significant because it brings together capabilities for traditional TV advertising and digital, according to Andrew Bloom, SVP of corporate development for DG and MediaMind. He said, “You have a company that sits at the heart of the TV ecosystem buying a digital campaign management platform that does delivery, planning, buying, optimization and reporting. A roadmap is laid out for how a single platform could begin to address TV, digital TV, digital and social media.”
Read more: CLickZ
Think Globally, Act Mobile-ly
The rise of the mobile Internet is a worldwide phenomenon with distinct local manifestations. Significant differences from country to country argue against imposing a monolithic, global approach to mobile media – tactics or practices that work well in one market may not prove optimal in others. However, there is much to gain from comparing the evolution of mobile in different markets and from cooperating and sharing information across countries. With that in mind, last year the Interactive Advertising Bureau (where I work) established the mobile committee-global.
Consisting of staffers from IABs around the world working on mobile media in their markets, this group holds calls every two months to share information and insights, provide project updates, and facilitate mobile coordination between the various international IABs. As a kickoff project, the IAB has published a global mobile anthology providing insights into different countries’ experiences with mobile media, contributed by about a dozen of the global IABs. A few key themes emerge around adoption of voice and data and the state of basic and advanced mobile media.
Read more: ClickZ

04/10/12
Amanda Maffey

News of the Day


Instagram Deal Sharpens Facebook’s Mobile Focus

Aiming to remain a key hub for sharing photos, Facebook acquired mobile photo application Instagram for $1 billion in cash and stock. The transaction — Facebook’s largest to date — also underscores the company’s efforts to bolster its mobile offerings. Instagram will continue to operate as an independent business under the same name.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a post that the acquisition would enhance the ability of Facebook users to upload and exchange photos among family and friends.

“We need to be mindful about keeping and building on Instagram’s strengths and features rather than just trying to integrate everything into Facebook,” wrote Zuckerberg. “That’s why we’re committed to building and growing Instagram independently. ”Millions of people around the world love the Instagram app and the brand associated with it, and our goal is to help spread this app and brand to even more people.” Launched in October 2010, the Instagram app now has more than 30 million registered users.

Read more: MediaPost
One Year Later, What We’ve Learned About Private Ad Exchanges
If 2011 was the year of testing for publishers who operate so-called private ad exchanges, 2012 looks like it may be the year of putting lessons into action. Private exchanges began popping up in late 2010, with the goal of increasing the price of online-ad inventory that was going unsold by direct-sales teams.

To accomplish that, publishers license real-time bidding technology from tech partners. It helps them orchestrate auctions for ad impressions and determine which buyers get access to inventory, as well as what inventory is made available at what prices. Though exchanges have perhaps dozens of other characteristics, that’s where the standardization ends.

That’s because publishers who have taken the leap have charted vastly different paths, employing sometimes contradictory business rules, forcing advertisers and the trading desks and technologies through which they bid on audience segments to learn about each on the fly.

Take, for example, the thorny problem of whether to sell private-exchange inventory to advertisers already making more-expensive ad buys from the sales team. Some publishers fear that big-spending direct advertisers will spend less or stop spending altogether on reserved inventory if they see how much cheaper the unreserved inventory is in the private marketplace.

Read more: AdAgeDigital

ABOUT

in.media's core mission is to maintain a community inside digital media (in 'dot' media). We will keep you informed of the most important news stories, discuss issues and opportunities facing our industry and provide those who are working in the trenches a vehicle to voice their own opinions.

FOLLOW US

facebook twitter linkedin rss

SEARCH